IJWI – Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute http://ijwi.net Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute Thu, 20 Mar 2014 16:29:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.3 Editorials Introduction http://ijwi.net/?p=153 http://ijwi.net/?p=153#respond Fri, 17 Feb 2012 18:36:08 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=153 more »]]> Opinion writing and visual commentary are essential components of journalistic writing. Editorials, guest commentaries and letters to the editor allow the publication and its readers to enter into dialogue. The editorial cartoonist adds another dimension to looking at different angles of a topic, issue, organization or individual.

“Only a Matter of Opinion?” was created in the summer of 2000 as an entry in the ThinkQuest for Tomorrow’s Teachers online education competition. It received the platinum award, the highest recognition in its category. We hope you find its content useful.

Visit “Only a Matter of Opinion?

The website is divided into four main categories — Editorials, Commentary/Columns, Editorial Cartooning and Art of Writing. Professional and student models, lesson ideas and resources are included in each section.

The ThinkQuest team was composed of Carol Lange and her former Intensive Journalistic Writing/APJ student, Xian Ke, from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, Va.; Ron Bennett, BYU-Idaho and former high school journalism educator; and Diane Weber, Birmingham, Alabama. Carol, Ron and Diane were among the 15 teachers who created the original IJW curriculum in 1988 at Marquette University under the auspices of Dow Jones News Fund.

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Variety Built Upon Shared Goals http://ijwi.net/?p=148 http://ijwi.net/?p=148#respond Fri, 17 Feb 2012 18:25:13 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=148 When the original 15 teachers met at Marquette University in 1988 to create a course that would combine an English honors-level composition course and a journalism course, it soon became clear that no one curriculum would serve the needs of all schools.

Some school systems would add the intensive journalistic writing approach to their program of studies if it were a sophomore honors course. Others required that it be part of an established American Literature (English 11), British Literature  (English 12) or World Literature (English 10 or 12) course. Other schools had approved an AP English Language and Composition course with a journalistic writing approach.

What would define an Intensive Journalistic Writing course? The 15 teachers agreed on seven goals that would form the foundation of all IJW classes. Teachers have found many ways to incorporate these into their curriculum.

  1. To teach the writing process using a journalistic process mode
  2. To correlate and integrate journalistic and rhetorical modes
  3. To use journalistic techniques to write clearly and succinctly
  4. To teach students to observe, to research, to interview, and to organize
  5. To provide a variety of classical and contemporary models
  6. To develop students’ critical reading and thinking skills
  7. To teach students to compose in a variety of modes for different purposes and audiences
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Intensive Journalistic Writing Courses Give Summer Reading Assignments http://ijwi.net/?p=138 http://ijwi.net/?p=138#respond Fri, 17 Feb 2012 18:12:16 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=138 article Intensive Journalistic Writing Courses Give Summer Reading Assignments

http://balacatering.com/photos/

Alan Weintraut, the film study, print and online journalism teacher at Annandale (Va.) High School, is an Intenisve Journalistic Writing Institute participant and leader who developed a strong program. When Alan’s AP English Language and Composition sections grew, Joy Korones  teamed with Alan to teach one of the classes. Below is the letter their registered students received before school was out in June 2010. This is the first assignment of the 2010-2011 academic year.

Date: June 9, 2010

To: AP English Language and Composition students

From: Mr. Weintraut, ajweintraut@gmail.com; Ms. Korones, joykorones@aol.com

Re: Summer reading assignments

First off, we look forward to meeting all of you on the first day of class! The course is officially called “AP English Language and Composition,” though the content has not changed drastically from when it was called AP Journalism. As you know, this is a rigorous writing course, and you’ll need to complete some summer work.

Please remember that this is a rigorous writing course, and students should be enrolled in the course only if they have:

  • Intellectual curiosity
  • A desire to read nonfiction pieces
  • A desire to write every day and improve their writing
  • A proficiency in completing homework assignments
  • A desire to work hard in an accelerated class

Although next year is one of the last things on your minds, here is the overview of the assignments due on the first day of school. Of course, be careful not to leave them until the last minute. You must see your counselor to determine which teacher you have for next year. You will communicate with one of us over the summer about your homework.

Please read all of the following directions very carefully—the deadlines for a couple assignments are nearer than you expect. Please e-mail us if you have any questions, but be sure to identify yourself using first and last name in the heading of the e-mail so it doesn’t get mistaken for Spam.

Assign. #1—Novel Reading & Written Analysis

Choose a book to read from the list below:

What Really Happened to the Class of ’93 by Chris Colin (a TJHSST graduate)

Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

This Boy’s Life by Tobias Wolff

The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

Friday Night Lights by H. G. Bissinger

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek or The Writing Life by Annie Dillard

Once you’ve selected your book, complete a 3-4 page analysis of the book as a whole. You must blend some criticism and personal reflection within your writing to avoid a dry retelling of the book. You should consider the response to be more than just a “book review” of your chosen book. The grade will be based on your critical thinking that is applied to the reading.  Please include your personal responses to major sections of the book. You must answer some or all of these questions in the text of your review:

  • For whom is the intended audience of this work? Conduct research on sales figures, publishing house and critical reviews at the time of its publication.
  • What were the cultural, political and social circumstances at the time of the book’s publication? Elaborate with detail.
  • How did the author’s biographical and educational background lead him/her to writing this book? What strategies of rhetoric and persuasion does   the writer employ?
  • What entails good writing? Provide some direct examples from the book, cite page numbers, and explain how those passages constitute good writing.
  • How did you respond to certain passages of the book? How did you react personally? Why?
  • What did book critics say at the time of the novel’s publication? (Do not simply cite quotes from the back cover of the book. Do a little research.)

Assign. #2—Choose one of the following: Do some online research to learn more about these books (Amazon.com is a good place to start), and choose one to read. You will give a 15-20 slide PowerPoint presentation on the first day of class. The content will be the same as your written analysis. However, the only content you will need to provide is your PPT. Please refer to the rubric when you prepare for this assignment.

The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester

Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

Zeitoun by Dave Eggers

Optional, extra credit assignment #3—Reading of Be True to Your School, by Bob Greene

Bob Greene is a famous journalist who was a columnist for the Chicago Tribune, and he’s written several books, one of them about Michael Jordan. Be True to Your School is an account of Greene’s life in 1964—his junior year in high school as recorded in his journal. It’s a first person, quick read and an amusing account of what high school was like the year the Beatles landed. You will be required to keep a journal throughout your senior year, and this book gives you a good example of what can happen when you are a disciplined, daily writer. Reading this book and completing a 3-4 page critical evaluation of the book will give you between 5-10 percent added to your 1st quarter grade. You will also have a simple “book talk” with me about the novel once school has started.

DEADLINES—VERY IMPORTANT

You must e-mail your teacher with your selections by June 30. We will approve your selections on a first come, first served basis.

For your summer readings, you should buy the book so you are free to mark up the text as you read.

LAST WORDS

Enjoy your summer, but don’t delay in starting your reading. Feel free to contact me with any questions you have. The total value these assignments will have on your 1st quarter grade can be as high as 20%.

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Join us in Boston in June http://ijwi.net/?p=97 Tue, 29 Nov 2011 21:50:48 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=97 Boston skyline

Join us this summer in Boston to learn how to use journalistic writing techniques in your Advanced Placement English Language and Composition and journalism classes. You will learn from Boston Globe writers and successful IJW educators, visit historic and literary places and create new lesson plans for your students.

Over the river and through the woods.

About the program

Since 1988, the Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute (IJWI) has trained hundreds of English and journalism teachers around the country in new approaches to teaching writing, using real examples of contemporary and classic journalistic models.

The title is an accurate reflection of what to expect. Our schedule will be intensive and the sessions extensive. You will read journalistic models and explore journalistic writing modes. You will learn teaching techniques and write new unit plans that include journalistic writing in your English curriculum.

Upon completion of the course, you will be able to offer AP English Language & Composition at the junior or senior level. (This Institute will not prepare you for a newspaper production class.) High schools give English, composition, fine arts or technical writing credit for courses using the IJWI approach.

What will I learn?

During the seven days of IJWI, teachers will learn to:

  • use journalistic forms as foundations for effective writing
  • integrate journalistic and rhetorical modes in their classrooms
  • develop a body of knowledge about teaching writing
  • incorporate First Amendment study and principles
  • use new approaches for preparing students to sit for the AP English Language & Composition Examination, including the synthesis portion
  • write, research and report like a 21st century journalist
  • identify specific techniques for individualized instruction
  • include historic American journalistic and literary works into your course
  • have the framework to write a curriculum guide

Institute faculty

The lead teachers are Carol Lange and Ron Bennett, both members of the first Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute that created the IJW approach and foundation curriculum. From 1990-2005, they teamed to lead IJW institutes.

Carol Lange

Carol has been teaching with the Institute since it began under the auspices of the Dow Jones News Fund (DJNF) in 1988. Lange was the 1991 DJNF National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year and the JEA Carl Towley recipient.

Ron Bennett

Ron Bennett

Ron introduced the IJW approach at two high schools before moving to BYU-Idaho where he has been the Communication Department chair and instructor of Communications Writing and Advanced Media Writing.

Other educators who have successfully incorporated journalism in the English classroom will share lesson plans. These include Brian Baron, Newton South HS; Colleen Gacic, Scituate HS; and Will Higgins, Dartmouth H.S. Guest lecturers from The Boston Globe will provide additional perspectives on journalistic writing.

Institute location and costs

IJWI will be held at The Boston Globe headquarters. Located near UMass Boston and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, The Globe provides a comfortable meeting place with all the amenities we need.

Founded in 1872, The Globe is well respected for its investigative work, local reporting and involvement in the community. Art critic Sebastian Smee is the most recent of 21 Globe staffers to receive the Pulitzer Prize.  Ellen Goodman, who has appeared on the AP exam, was the 1980 recipient for Distinguished Commentary.

Off-site seminars will highlight historic and literary Boston.

The 2012 IJWI begins at 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 24. The last session will end at 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 30.

The fee for the seven-day Institute is $400 per person. Institute participants will receive the IJW Notebook, an IJWI feature full of handouts and resources for classroom use.

Boston

Boston will be an active participant in the Institute — giving historic perspective, inviting all to explore its many dimensions and offering an enriching environment for learning. The first regularly issued American newspaper, the Boston News-Letter, was published in 1704. Environmental journalists, the Boston Common was the first public park. Political reporters, the first State constitution was written here in 1780. Food critics, visit the Union Oyster House, open since 1714, and check out the first cookbook in America, Fannie Farmer’s The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book.” Technology, education and sports reporters, you have your firsts to explore in Boston as well.

Paul Revere House

The Freedom Trail, museums, art galleries and nearby environs will be woven into the IJWI experience.

Boston is an easily accessed city with Logan International Airport, Amtrak and three main routes — I-90 from the west, I-95 and I-93 from the north and south. You’ll get to know the T and pedestrian routes and trails.

Lodging

Participants may find their own lodging or commute from home. We have arranged for rooms at The College Club of Boston at a discount. Located near Boston Common and an easy walk to the Charles River, Beacon Hill, and Newbury Street with its unique stores and restaurants, The College Club of Boston provides an ideal location.

College Club of BostonThree floors of guest rooms are accessible by elevator: two double rooms per floor have en suite baths and two single rooms share one bath. Antiques, reproductions and interior colors evoke the charm of graceful Boston. Each room has been designed to reflect a local university and provide a comfortable stay. Individual air-conditioning units, hair dryers and clock radio/alarm clocks will keep you on time.

The rates include complimentary continental buffet breakfast, wireless and dial-up Internet access, and daily maid service. In the evenings, gather in the dining room to watch television as you eat homemade cookies and sip coffee, tea or cocoa. For more views of The College Club of Boston visit www.thecollegeclubofboston.com. Single room/shared bath is $125.15 per night. Single or double room/private bath is $251.33 per night.

Call before May 24, 2012, to reserve your room at the discounted rate: (617) 536-9510. Be sure to say you are an IJWI attendee.

Participants may wish to stay after the Institute to attend the fabulous Fourth of July festivities and explore the area. The College Club of Boston will give participants a discount if they wish to extend their stay.

Institute Fee

The IJWI fee is $400. The registration deadline to take the institute is May 16.

This registration form for the Institute must be accompanied with a deposit of $200 made payable to Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute. Final payment must be made by June 16. If cancellation takes place five or fewer days before June 24, IJWI does not allow a refund.

IJWI begins at 5:50 p.m. on Sunday, June 24, and ends on Saturday, June 30, at 5:00 p.m. For more information about opening and closing days contact Carol Lange at LangeJour@aol.com.

Course credit

IJWI has been offered in the past for two or three academic credits. If sufficient registered participants indicate interest, we will seek academic credit.

Download the form here.

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What is IJW? http://ijwi.net/?p=86 http://ijwi.net/?p=86#respond Mon, 28 Feb 2011 17:40:49 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=86 more »]]> The Intensive Journalistic Writing (IJW) course blends journalism with an English composition course.

A non-production, English-credit class, it has none of the demands of layout, design and production schedules. Rather, it concentrates on teaching students modern writing techniques that are used by today’s newspaper and magazine writers.

Students who do not have an interest in taking or time in their schedules for Journalism I get training in thinking like a journalist within the environment of an English-credited class. Most IJW classes are open admission.

An IJW course not only provides an English credit toward graduation but also makes it possible for students to earn college credit if they pass the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Examination.

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What is an Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute? http://ijwi.net/?p=88 http://ijwi.net/?p=88#respond Mon, 28 Feb 2011 16:41:56 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=88 more »]]> Since 1988, the Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute (IJWI) and IJW workshops have trained more than 500 English and journalism teachers around the country in new approaches to teaching writing, using real examples of contemporary and classic journalistic models and modes.

The title is an accurate reflection of what participating teachers can expect. Our schedule is intensive and the sessions are extensive. Teachers read journalistic models and explore journalistic writing modes. We share approaches that have worked in classrooms and provide examples to stimulate discussion. Teachers learn teaching techniques and write new unit plans that include journalistic writing in their English curriculum.

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About the Program http://ijwi.net/?p=42 http://ijwi.net/?p=42#respond Fri, 25 Feb 2011 17:42:15 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=42 ABOUT THE PROGRAM
Since 1988, the Intensive Journalistic Writing Institute (IJWI) has trained hundreds of English and journalism teachers around the country in new approaches to teaching writing, using real examples of contemporary and classic journalistic models.

The title is an accurate reflection of what to expect. Our schedule will be intensive and the sessions extensive. You will read journalistic models and explore journalistic writing modes. You will learn teaching techniques and write new unit plans that include journalistic writing in your English curriculum.

Upon completion of the course, you will be able to offer AP English Language & Composition at the junior or senior level. (This institute will not prepare you for a newspaper production class.) High schools give English, fine arts or technical writing credit for IJWI.

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Faculty http://ijwi.net/?p=51 http://ijwi.net/?p=51#respond Fri, 25 Feb 2011 17:40:57 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=51 INSTITUTE FACULTY

The lead teachers are Carol Lange and Alan Weintraut, both veteran teachers from Fairfax County, Va.

Lange has been teaching with the Institute since it began under the auspices of the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund (DJNF) in 1988. Lange was the 1991 DJNF National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year.

Alan Weintraut has been teaching AP English Language at Annandale High School since participating in the 1996 IJWI. The adviser of a student newspaper and multimedia program, Weintraut was the 2006 DJNF National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year.

Other teachers who have successfully incorporated journalism in the English classroom will share lesson plans. Guest lecturers from The Washington Post and the Newseum will provide additional perspectives on journalistic writing.

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Registration Form http://ijwi.net/?p=10 http://ijwi.net/?p=10#respond Fri, 25 Feb 2011 13:36:00 +0000 http://ijwi.net/?p=10 ]]> http://ijwi.net/?feed=rss2&p=10 0